Wise words from Michelle Obama

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Hi Friends,

I had the privilege and honor of seeing Michelle Obama speak today at the Inbound 2017 conference. When asked about how she is able to maintain her grace, she said "One thing that guides my grace is my children and other children. How they see me reacting gives them guidance." That's a huge part of what Moms as Mentors is founded upon. We encourage moms to not just encourage confidence in their girls, but to exhibit/model confidence themselves, even when it's difficult to do so.

It's also why we are so encouraged to find out that, while not an explicit goal of our programs, 75% of participating moms have felt their OWN confidence and leadership skills improved after attending one.  More confident moms means more confident girls!  It also means more confident women leaders in the workforce and in our communities. And that doesn't just benefit women and girls, it benefits everyone (and if you need convincing, here are just a few reasons why).

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Want to experience the power of our programs? Click HERE to learn about our two fall workshops.

And thanks to Michelle Obama, for being a tireless advocate for girls and an inspirational mom and mentor to so many.

Warmly,
Leslie

 

It's confidence, not competence...

A new study was just released by National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) that reveals that “girls outperformed boys on a national test of technology and engineering literacy (learn more about this study and Moms as Mentors® work by clicking here).

While these results may or may not surprise you, there’s one group of people who may be surprised…THE GIRLS.

Why?

A mom and daughter slap-five after getting their ping pong ball launcher to work at our STEM program Build Bridges! Photo by Diane Hammer

A mom and daughter slap-five after getting their ping pong ball launcher to work at our STEM program Build Bridges! Photo by Diane Hammer

Because according to research by the AAUW:

"Girls are much more likely than boys to say they are “not smart enough” or “not good enough” for their dream careers."

Studies like the one released today tell us that it is confidence, not competence, that contributes in large part to the lack of women in the STEM fields, particularly in engineering and computer science. And, without explicitly addressing these issues, girls aren’t just naturally going to be entering and staying in the STEM pipeline.

That’s why at Moms as Mentors®, we give moms (typically the most consistent and significant female role models for girls) the tools and opportunities to build their daughter’s confidence in the STEM fields. We believe that regardless of a mom’s educational or career path, she can be a “STEM mentor” for her daughter.

How can someone who is not in STEM be a STEM mentor?

Because even without a STEM background, moms can promote the skills, confidence and resilience necessary to succeed in STEM and expose her to a wide range of career paths.

Moms can promote “tinkering” by making sure their girls’ toys involve building, constructing and taking things apart. They can promote the “growth mindset” if and when their daughters say they just “aren’t good at math.” They can spend time with their daughter working on activities that involve good communication and collaboration skills.

Today’s results reaffirm that girls have the ability to become tomorrow’s influential STEM leaders--we know that. Now we need to make sure they know it.

(Want to be a STEM mentor but not sure where to begin? Moms as Mentors® can help! Check out our offerings http://www.momsasmentors.org/types/).

"We had confidence in our ability to LEARN to run a business"

Two girls participating in our Make It Count! program

Two girls participating in our Make It Count! program

We're so excited for our upcoming Make It Count! program at Moms as Mentors®.  For those of you who haven't attended, Make It Count! is an empowering mom-daughter program that helps moms and girls bond, while doing activities together that promote financial empowerment and spark girls' interest in business/entrepreneurship.

We believe that an important part of girls building the confidence to pursue fields like business and entrepreneurship is hearing stories of real women entrepreneurs.

Girls need to know that being successful means being resilient, picking yourself up when you face an obstacle, learning from it and moving on to the next challenge. So I was thrilled when I had the chance to speak with Julie Cole, one of the Co-Founders (all mothers) of the extraordinarily successful business Mabel's Labels.

For those of you who don't know, Mabel’s Labels is an award-winning company that sells personalized durable labels for families. Among other honors, they have received the 2014 RBC Women Entrepreneur Award-PROFIT Award for Excellence in Entrepreneurship and have been featured on shows like The View, Today, The Early Show, Rachael Ray and many magazines, newspapers and countless other blogs and websites.

Here are some highlights from my recent conversation with Julie:

LESLIE: Two aims of our Make It Count! program are to increase confidence, both of girls and their moms, and to help nurture their entrepreneurial spirits. As a girl and/or woman, who or what has made the biggest impact on your confidence?

JULIE: My mother and grandmother. I think it's really important for girls to not only have great role models, but people who have unwavering confidence in them. That's what I had and it positioned me well. My mom used to say that parents need to give children "roots and wings," roots to build them a strong foundation and then wings to let them go. And that's what she gave me. I was raised being told I could do anything by both parents. They had high expectations but were always encouraging.

Julie Cole (Far Left) with her Three Fellow Co-Founders of Mabel's Labels

Julie Cole (Far Left) with her Three Fellow Co-Founders of Mabel's Labels

LESLIE: How has your confidence level in yourself changed since you first started Mabel's Labels?

JULIE: I was a fairly confident person already but when we started, we knew nothing about business and didn't have business degrees. So we didn't have confidence in running a business, BUT we had confidence in our ability to learn to run a business and to ask for help when we needed it. We were prepared to take risks and confident that we could learn from any mistakes we made.  We always said there's only learning, no failure. We never made the same mistake twice and were able to apply lessons we learned from any challenges we faced to whatever our next project was. This whole learning process leads to confidence.

LESLIE: We also emphasize the importance of resilience. Could you share a time when Mabel's Labels faced an obstacle/"failed at something" and what gave you the determination to keep going? 

JULIE: Oh my gosh, there have been so many-it's hard to think of just one! I would say that one challenge we've faced comes from having four Co-Founders with four different personalities and communication style. We've had to learn how to improve our communication the hard way, and have had times when our communications went off track. We realized that we needed some outside coaching...so we got some! And while it's still a challenge, we have become more aware of different communication styles and more empathetic towards one another.

LESLIE: Did you always see yourself as entrepreneurial? Or was this something you didn't know about yourself until you had the inspiration for Mabel's Labels ?

JULIE: I didn't...I thought I was going to be a legal aid and practice family law! It's funny where life's paths take us... but while I may not have grown up thinking of myself as an entrepreneur, I believe entrepreneurship is no different than being good at something like music. Just like you can learn and practice piano to become good at it,  over time you can learn to become an entrepreneur.

LESLIE: Do you have any advice for moms who want to encourage their daughters to be entrepreneurial?

JULIE: Encouraging your daughter to follow entrepreneurial pursuits can take a lot of your time as a background support...but it will be the most rewarding thing you can do. Encourage your daughters to be innovative, think outside the box, hone their skills and talents-all of this will make for a fun and feisty life! Also, encourage your daughters to make their own money, have their own bank accounts...help them to become self-reliant and independent (you can do this through role-modeling as well)!.

A mom and daughter share their "Needs vs. Wants" poster at Make It Count!

A mom and daughter share their "Needs vs. Wants" poster at Make It Count!

Thank you to Julie for taking the time to speak with Moms as Mentors® and share her own journey with confidence and entrepreneurship.

Moms--we hope you join us on April 30th at Simmons College at our Make It Count! program, which gives you a chance to nurture your daughter's inner entrepreneur (that you might not know she had!). For details and to register, go to https://makeitcount-simmons-april30.eventbrite.com

 

 

THANK YOU!

Hi Friends,

As our campaign ends in a matter of hours, I just wanted to take a moment to say thank you.

This campaign has been a huge opportunity for Moms as Mentors®--to share our work with the world, to put our needs out there and have the community respond, to get more people involved in our mission, to hear what our programs mean to the moms and girls we serve.

So thank you for giving us this important opportunity.

Thank you to our mailing list for bearing with frequent emails in your inbox. And for opening however many of them you opened and taking a moment to read what we had to say. And for not unsubscribing! That's no small task when an organization has spent weeks asking for your support. We promise the campaign ends today!

To our social media community--thanks for sharing our posts. "Liking" them and liking our page. Tweeting and retweeting. Because of you, we have a whole new community of people interested in our work to help empower moms and girls.

To our supporters we want to give an EXTRA big thank you...so THANK YOU! When we set out to do a campaign, we didn't know what would happen-it's the first one we'd ever done! But you all came through for us in a HUGE way. More than 80 of you said "I'm going to do my part to help Moms as Mentors® raise girls' confidence and strengthen the critical bond between moms and girls." And because of that, this campaign definitely can be considered a huge success. 

And, so many of you, whether or not you were able to make a financial contribution, have helped spread the word about our campaign, which deserves another thank you.

To our valued advisory board members and team of exceptional volunteers and interns, thank you! You've showed your support in so many ways. Without you, we wouldn't be able to deliver such impactful programs and have the ability to share it with the world. We owe you so much.

And thank you to our close family and friends--who've been patient as we've had tunnel-like vision during the campaign and supported the campaign in so many ways, through financial contributions as well as moral support, cheerleading, proof-reading, brainstorming, advice-giving, and so much more (I want to give an extra big thank you to my brother Aaron, who has been an amazing and constant source of support throughout this whole campaign. Thank you, thank you.).

Thanks to our extended family and old friends from middle, high school, college, and previous jobs who rallied behind us and supported our campaign. It was such a nice surprise to see your names on our campaign page and I can't thank you enough for your belief in us. 

I want to thank all of you for giving me, personally, the chance to run this campaign. I've never done anything like this before and I was way outside my comfort-zone. And yet you all were so supportive, as I put my feelings and insecurities out there, through our blog and other channels, about speaking up and asking for what we need. I've grown throughout this process and feel in a better position to lead and serve women and girls as a result of this experience. Many times, I've needed to be reminded of the same lessons about confidence and empowerment that we teach the girls and moms in our program! And you all were there to do that and offer invaluable words of encouragement. 

And thank you for understanding that this campaign has consumed me over the past two months, and as a result I've been poor at keeping in touch and behind on responding to emails. I look forward to catching up with you now that the campaign is coming to an end.

Thanks everyone. I feel lucky to be part of such a wonderful and supportive community of people committed to helping girls become confident, influential women.

Warmly,
Leslie

P.S. I would be remiss if I didn't say, for what will likely be the final time, that it's not too late to support our campaign! DONATE NOW and your gift will be matched 1:1. 

 

I've said TOO MUCH.

Dear Friends,

We have less than 32 hours left in our crowd-funding campaign. And I find myself with too much to say--that's because I want to leave it ALL on the table. I want to make sure you can make an informed decision about if you will join the others who have said "I'm going to do my part to help Moms as Mentors® raise girls' confidence and strengthen the critical bond between moms and girls.

So... here is TOO MUCH about Moms as Mentors, including:

  • Chief Program Officer Mandy Hickling speaks about the powerful moments that happen at our programs

  • How I want to answer the question, "When's the next program??"

  • Where your contributions will go

  • What's our Impact On Moms?

  • What's our Impact on Girls?

  • Get a peek inside our programs...

  • What do moms say is most powerful about our programs?

  • What do girls say about our programs?

  • Promoting confidence and bonding beyond our programs

  • Our most Important and revealing blog posts

  • In their own words: What Moms as Mentors® means to...

 

For however long you join me on this EPIC post, thanks for coming along.

(NOTE: Too busy to read anymore but believe in our work? No problem! Just click the purple button)

Chief Program Officer Mandy Hickling speaks about the powerful moments that happen at our programs

How I want to answer the question, "When's the next program??"

Margot helps out a mom and daughter with their project.jpg

Where your contributions will go

Your contributions will mean the difference between our running a small handful programs a year in a very limited number of communities, without adding in anything new for the people who've already attended our existing programs and our being able to meet the demand for: 

  • more frequent programs in a wider group of communities (by recruiting and training more skilled program facilitators)
  • new programs in our three content areas (STEM, business & social-emotional learning) so past program participants can continue to attend programs
  • more program formats (including running more series of weekly or monthly workshops)
  • more frequent "moms'-only sessions" to provide moms with more tools to help raise confident girls and opportunities to join a supportive, diverse community of moms that can be invaluable sources of support, both for parenting and other personal and professional matters.

What's our Impact On Moms?

These are the kind of off-the-charts positive feedback we typically receive after our programs.

The Mother-Daughter Relationship

  • 96% of moms achieved their goals for attending our programs (most common goals were to “have fun with my daughter” and “strengthen our relationship”)
  • 92% reported feeling a stronger bond with daughter (even those that already had one before) 
  • 93% felt they left with tools for helping their daughter through adolescence

As “Money” Mentors

  • 100% of moms said our program lay the foundation for familial conversations about money
  • 100% of moms said the program sparked a new interest/enthusiasm for their daughters in entrepreneurship

As “STEM” Mentors

  • 100% of participating moms said our program gave them tools for being a “STEM” mentor for their daughter

Unexpected Positive Impact

  • While not an explicit goal of our programs, 75% of participating moms felt their OWN leadership skills improved    

What's our impact on the girls?

Girls in kindergarten through 8th grade report feeling closer to their moms, more confident and excited about STEM and business as a result of our programs.

Mother-Daughter Relationship

  • 98% of girls achieved their goals for attending our programs (most common goal was “have fun with my mom”)
  • 93% of girls reported feeling a stronger bond with mom (even those that already had one before) 

On Leadership and Confidence

  • 82% reported feeling more confident to face difficult situations in adolescence (e.g. gossiping, bullying)
  • 76% left feeling they had more tools to be a leader among their friends

On STEM

  • 100% of participating girls reported that our program “made science and engineering fun” 

On Money and Entrepreneurship

  • 100% of participating girls reported that our program “made money and business fun”

Get a peek inside our programs...

It's hard to truly capture the special moments that occur between moms and girls at our program, even on video. But here are just a few moments we caught on camera of moms and girls working together (warning: contains raw footage-my video editing skills are a work in progress!).

What do moms say is most powerful about our programs?

  • The uninterrupted time together: “The best part of the experience was getting to enjoy spending time with my daughter and vice versa in a fun, no stress environment. It's sometimes easy to forget how much fun it can be to just hang out with her. I have several younger children and it was so awesome to spend some one on one time with my daughter doing something that was educational and empowering.”
     
  • Working together: “The program brought us closer together and imbued a sense of curiosity and "working together" in our relationship that has carried forward, mostly in doing normal household tasks like cooking, cleaning, preparing for holidays, and running errands but there is lots of love & joy in those shared day-to-day experiences. That is what life is really about.”
     
  • Instilling curiosity and a love of learning:     "We look to our schools, teachers, enrichment classes, sports programs to help our children achieve their fullest potential, but it really has to come from us, and nothing is more powerful than instilling curiosity and a love of learning. This program is a great reminder of how important it is to do that, and how we can all do that."
     
  • Learning new things about each other:  “We brought my daughter's grandmother and we all related to each other in a way we really have never had the chance to do. We collaborated together, and respected each other's ideas, and even learned new things about each other!”
     
  • Instilling confidence:  “One of my proudest moments as a mother was during the activity where the girls name the job matches the woman in the picture. The first one she went to was the picture of the professional African-American woman and she wrote "president." All the activities that day were reinforcement to my daughter that she can do anything she wants to, up to and including being the president. “
     
  • Providing positive opportunities with STEM and business that carry on at home:   "I really walked away with a commitment to ensuring my daughter has the same opportunities to explore STEM. She was so excited to help build a roller coaster and I realized I subconsciously had not been thinking about engineering projects for her nearly as much as I do for my son. "
     
  • Lasting Memories:  "Finding time to spend with my daughter is hard, finding time to spend with my daughter where we are both doing something fun and challenging and where we both learn something new is very rare in deed. In our normal day to day life I spend time organizing, doing drop offs and pick ups for my children’s activities and our conversation is focused on what they did today. By taking part in a Moms As Mentors program we get to spend time having fun together and grappling with a challenge - we share an experience that lives beyond the program."
TRANSLATION: "THIS IS THE FUNNEST ACTIVITY I HAVE EVER DONE

TRANSLATION: "THIS IS THE FUNNEST ACTIVITY I HAVE EVER DONE

What do girls say about our programs?

  • “Best day ever!”

  • (MOM:) "She kissed me and told me she loved me over and over and kept saying what a great morning she had.  We went out for lunch and continued talking about the bracelets and the activity. She was skeptical about coming out of her pjs on her day off but was so glad she had!"

  • “Wow!...! I had such a great time and I learned so much about my mother.”

  • "Super fun"

  • (MOM:) My daughter is always asking what can we do next with moms as mentors

  • "I would recommend this program because I want everyone to know, so they come too!"

  • "self-empowering"

  • (MOM:) "She is constantly talking about her "business plan" to others.”

Promoting Confidence and Bonding Beyond Our Programs

Just one example of the unique perks we are offering as thank you gifts for our donors

Just one example of the unique perks we are offering as thank you gifts for our donors

For our campaign "perks" or thank you gifts we are offering many unique items, many of which  are not usually available to the public. Our perks were carefully selected and designed to raise confidence in and foster stronger bonds between children and adults, beyond just the mother-child relationship.These items can be found on the right side of our campaign page, which you can find by clicking HERE

Highlights include:

  • Mom-Daughter Bonding At Home These downloadable activity guides features an art or STEM (donor's choice) activity carefully designed to foster bonding and empowering moments for moms and girls. The guide includes an activity sheet and “Mom notes." Great for any adult and child (Pre-K-8th grade). 

  • Bonding At Home + Mentor Tools In addition to the At Home activity guide listed above, donors will be sent resources on how to be a mentor for their daughter/girl in their life. (normally just available at our in-person programs)  

  • X-Large Bonding Bundle Guaranteed to bring you and a special girl closer! This bundle features our At Home activity guide with our 2 activities, in addition to our mentor tips and resources, PLUS a copy of the book “How Girls’ Thrive” by JoAnn Deak, Ph.D. (with Dory Adams) 

Our most important and revealing blog posts:

In their own words: What Moms as Mentors® means to...

ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER JESS WEINER "Moms as Mentors makes a difference in the lives of so many mothers and girls through confidence building workshops...and by encouraging girls to explore roles in STEM and Business... By supporting Moms as Mentors, you are supporting their valuable programs that work to build strong and lasting effects for the women and girls involved." 
(Jess is CEO of Talk To Jess, Dove Global Self-Esteem Ambassador, best-selling author, social entrepreneur and one of Inc.'s "21 Thought Leaders Every Entrepreneur Should Follow in 2016")

Cynthia W., Derry, NH (Mom participant) "This is a wonderful and empowering experience...There is no other program out there with this unique female-empowering and mother-mentoring approach.  It's something that all mothers and daughters should be able to experience." 

Kerry P., Redding, CT (Mom Participant) "It's a chance to bond with your daughter on serious topics. Through the topics we discussed, my daughter actually related to me on a very respectful level and I was able to see how smart she is! It really opened the dialogue for more serious conversations!"

Megan P., Sherborn, MA (Mom Participant) "We look to our schools, teachers, enrichment classes, sports programs to help our children achieve their fullest potential, but it really has to come from us, and nothing is more powerful than instilling curiosity and a love of learning. This program is a great reminder of how important it is to do that, and how we can all do that.""

Delilah K., Holliston, MA (Mom Participant) It's an awesome program to get behind and really support. It's so important to support our young women and encourage them in areas that we might not think, to like STEM. There really are a lot of subconscious attitudes in our culture that steer young girls away from feeling confident in math and science and engineering. The moms as mentors programs tackle those preconceived expectations and make it fun at the same time. This is a great avenue to help the moms as mentors group to develop even more programming."

Moms as Mentors® Make It Count! Facilitator: "As a community educator and as a woman, I cannot stress how important these opportunities are for mothers and daughters to connect in the unique way that Moms as Mentors offers. It simply doesn’t happen organically as often as it should. A recent study by the Girl Scouts showed that mothers are still trailing fathers in confidence when it comes to giving advice about money matters, jobs, and leadership. Despite that, the same study shows that girls are still choosing to ask their mothers for this advice more so than their fathers. Opportunities like the ones I’ve been privileged to facilitate with Moms as Mentors are immensely important chances for women of all economic backgrounds to connect with their daughters in a meaningful, confidence-building way. They should be available to all women! "
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LAST CHANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE "MOM MATCH"

Your gift will be matched 1:1. Whatever you donate will make DOUBLE THE IMPACT.


Well you've reached the end...two ends more accurately. You got to the end of this post (you get a gold star for that!) and also THE END OF THE CAMPAIGN.

TIME IS ALMOST UP. If you want a guaranteed way to make a difference and help create the next generation of confident, influential women leaders, don't wait another minute.

Make a contribution now. 

Why I'm up at 4:30 AM writing This...

My daughter Lilly and I take a quick selfie on her school fieldtrip to Plymouth Plantation.

My daughter Lilly and I take a quick selfie on her school fieldtrip to Plymouth Plantation.

Dear Friends,

I'm writing to you in the one quiet hour I have before my three girls (Lilly, 8, Annie,  6, Hailey, 3) wake up, and the long day of drop-offs, pick-ups, meetings, phone calls, email, sports practice, the list goes on and on. 

It feels like yesterday ended just a few hours ago, and I think that's because it did. We talk about "Mom Busy" at Moms as Mentors® and it's a state of being that, like so many of you, I know all too well. 

Many people wonder, why, when I have a fulfilling, demanding full-time job and three young children, that I choose to keep Moms as Mentors® on my plate--and to devote every spare second I have to it, prioritizing it above sleep, hobbies, or time with friends.

It wasn't just in family photos that I wanted to disappear into the background. I often retreated into the background, even hiding in the school library so no one would hear me read aloud as I did my homework.

It wasn't just in family photos that I wanted to disappear into the background. I often retreated into the background, even hiding in the school library so no one would hear me read aloud as I did my homework.

People wonder why I do this when they see me frantically running around, sending off a quick text, racing to catch up on the phone with Leslie in between a work meeting and my daughter's parent-teacher conference.  Squeezing in Moms as Mentors® calls on my drive to work and finishing them sitting in my car in the parking lot before I run to my next meeting.

It's not because I'm a workaholic by nature. Or because I don't like sleep, free time, or spending extra time with family and friends. (I love all of that!).

It's because I believe 100% whole-heartedly in Moms as Mentors® mission and its power. It's because I remember what it felt like as a girl to struggle with confidence, to feel like I wasn't as smart as the other kids, to not believe in myself. 

And it's because I want to do everything in my power to help my own three daughters grow up with the strength to make good decisions in difficult situations. I want them to have the ability to choose their own career path, not because they perceive themselves as "not good enough" for one career or another, but because they're armed with the skills and confidence to choose any career they want.

And I've seen that our programs make a real impact on girls' confidence, leadership skills and sense of self.  In our social-emotional learning programs, 4 out of 5 girls who attend report feeling more confident to face difficult situations in adolescence and 3 out of 4 feel they have more tools to be a leader among their friends. Moms leave with tools for helping their daughters through adolescence AND feel more confident in their own leadership abilities.

Of course it's not easy to burn the candle at both ends, month after month, year after year. And I do have moments of doubt.  

But then I have moments like this one that I shared in an email last week:

These are the moments that make everything worth it, for me personally. And I know, for sure, that our programs have the power to give you and the girls in your life moments like this one, like they have for our past participants.

BUT THE REALITY IS...to develop and run programs that give you and your daughter, or other women and girls, these moments, we need your help.

Our crowd-funding campaign ends TOMORROW NIGHT. I'm here in the wee hours of the morning, asking for your help, so that girls today don't have to struggle with confidence the way I did as a youngster. Donations to the campaign will go towards:

  • EXPANDING OUR OFFERINGS  by creating  new curriculum for STEM, business & social-emotional learning programs

  • RUNNING MORE PROGRAMS MORE OFTEN by recruiting and training more program facilitators 

  • DEVELOPING MORE TOOLS FOR MOMS and  running a series of "moms' only" workshops

By doing this, girls confidence, leadership skills and sense of self can only improve.  Our statistics speak for themselves.

Okay,  I better wrap this up. I just heard my 3 year old stirring. So I'll end with this: 

My daughter Annie taking a break at one of the Moms as Mentors ® programs we were able to attend together

My daughter Annie taking a break at one of the Moms as Mentors ® programs we were able to attend together

If you believe in the work we are doing, you have the ability to impact how much of it we are able to give back to girls and women.

Please make a donation today by clicking HERE. Your gift will be matched 1:1. 

(And encourage your friends and fellow moms to donate as well!) 

Please help us make a difference.  

And, remember, when you empower a mom, you empower her daughter too.

Okay, now I hear two more kids up...and so another chaotic day of being a mom begins... :)

 

What's at stake...

Hi Friends,

Here's a brief clip of my sharing the kind of potential Moms as Mentors® has to meet the demand for more programs. (Excuse the choppy opening...my video editing skills are a work in progress).

We've talked a lot throughout our campaign about the power of Moms as Mentors® programs, to help strengthen the mother-daughter bond, to empower girls and moms, to spark interest in STEM and business etc. But, with our campaign ending so soon (TUESDAY!), I wanted to be extra sure we are clear about what is at stake in our campaign to the moms who hope to attend one of our programs either in the near or distant future. 

It's the difference between:

our running a small handful programs a year in a very limited number of communities, without adding in anything new for the people who've already attended our existing programs and

and

our being able to meet the demand for: 

  • more frequent programs in a wider group of communities (by recruiting and training more skilled program facilitators)
  • new programs in our three content areas (STEM, business & social-emotional learning) so past program participants can continue to attend programs
  • more program formats (including running more series of weekly or monthly workshops)
  • more frequent "moms'-only sessions" to provide moms with more tools to help raise confident girls and a supportive, diverse community of moms that can be invaluable sources of support, both for parenting and other personal and professional matters.

The more we raise, the more programs we can run.

So if you would like to see more Moms as Mentors® programs in your area and for your daughter(s) age group, we encourage you to donate today. 

Don't forget. Your gift will be matched 1:1 in our MOM Match (up to $5000).

WE ARE IN THE FINAL DAYS OF THE CAMPAIGN, but it's NOT TOO LATE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. Every dollar we raise helps. 

Do you know other moms who might benefit from our programs? Share our campaign with them so we can meet the demands of more families.

DONATE HERE.

How this Mom & Daughter Pair Went Swimming in the Shark Tank

All Moms as Mentors® programs emphasize confidence-building, bonding and good teamwork and communication between moms and girls. Our financial program Make It Count! also helps lay a foundation for familial conversations about money as well as nurture girls' entrepreneurial spirits.  

We are absolutely thrilled today to feature the mom and daughter behind one of the top 10 successful businesses in the history of ABC's Shark Tank (Shark Kevin "Mr. Wonderful" O'Leary's most profitable investment): Boston's own Wicked Good Cupcakes.

Tracey (Mom, Co-Founder & CEO)  and Dani (Daughter, Co-Founder) Noonan are an inspiring example of a mom and daughter pair who have worked and communicated well together, taken risks and certainly have an entrepreneurial spirit! 

Here's what Tracey shared with Moms as Mentors® about her relationship with her daughter, Shark Tank and Wicked Good Cupcakes:

Leslie: "As I looked back at your pitch on Shark Tank, I noticed that at one point you and Dani stepped outside to talk about the deal Kevin offered. I’m imagining this was perhaps the most important, high-stakes and pressure-packed conversation you and Dani would ever have about money (!) but the viewers don’t see that conversation.

Can you share with our readers a little bit about what happened during that conversation?  How well did the two of you communicate in that moment? What had prepared you for that conversation? Did the two of you have a history of good communication, including talking about money?"

Tracey: "That’s a great question! You are correct in assuming that there was a lot of pressure. We had a deal on the table that we didn’t want to lose and the time constraints of filming a reality show. So in a nutshell…We didn’t have much time.  A quick math calculation showed us that the royalty would work because we:

A) We were making money. Not losing or breaking even.

B) At some point the income coming in exceeds the ceiling that a royalty deal hits. Right now we pay Kevin the equivalent if he had taken 12% equity. If you remember correctly, we went in and offered 20% to start."

Leslie:  "Also, at the time you took the deal, all the other sharks were strongly discouraging you from taking a royalty offer from Kevin. What gave you and Dani the confidence to accept the deal? Was one of you more confident than the other?"

Tracey: "For me the deal was more about the partnership and the inroads that a Shark like Kevin has. Introductions, media, PR…It’s all worth its weight in gold. Knowing we could potentially score that type of help and exposure meant more to me than “a few dollars”.  Dani being relatively naïve about the business world and filming a reality show in general was shaken by Mark and Daymond’s antics. I knew it was for television more than anything. She was a bit shaken and it took some explaining, convincing and educating for her to see how beneficial the deal would be. Now she’s 100% on board because we’ve gotten to know Kevin really well and have seen his sincere interest in us and our business. At the end of the day he wants nothing more than to see us succeed." 

Leslie: "What, if anything, have you both learned about each other since you started Wicked Good Cupcakes?"

Tracey: "We’ve learned a lot about each other. We’ve shared so many awesome, fun experiences…And we’ve shared really hard times with one another. You really get to know a person’s character when you work and live with someone. Especially when a business takes off and grows 600% in a year! The biggest lesson we’ve learned is, at the end of the day we’re a family first. Any disagreements or harsh words are left behind when we go home. It’s been an amazing ride and I’m grateful every single day to Shark Tank, Kevin and my family." 

Thanks so much to Tracey for taking the time to share her and Dani's story with the Moms as Mentors® Community. 

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Did you know that 100% of moms at Moms as Mentors® business program say it sparked a new enthusiasm for their daughters in entrepreneurship?  AND, 75% of moms who've participated in our programs with their daughters feel they improved their own leadership skills.

Your gift to Moms as Mentors will ensure our programs continue to spark girls' interest in business (and STEM).

Only 1 week left to support our Empower Moms. Empower Girls. campaign

DONATE NOW and your gift will be matched through our MOM MATCH CHALLENGE!

"Resilience is important but faith in yourself is at the root of it."

Two aims of our financial empowerment/business program Make It Count! are to increase confidence, both of girls and their moms, and to help nurture their entrepreneurial spirits. We believe that sharing real stories of female entrepreneurs is a powerful way to convey to girls (and women) that often the path to success isn't a straight one.

We are thrilled today to share an interview with inspiring female "mompreneur" Susie K. TaylorBibbitec Founder and Inventor of "The Ultimate Bib." Susie and the Ultimate Bib were featured on ABC's Shark Tank.  Thanks so much Susie for telling us her story and being our first featured entrepreneur on the Moms as Mentors® blog!  

As a girl and/or woman, who or what has made the biggest impact on your confidence?

I studied acting from a very young age. Getting into characters that were beyond any personal experiences and speaking lines, especially Shakespeare’s line, expanded my sense of SELF. I was not just a Jewish girl from Miami. I was a million and one different characters if I chose to dig deep enough…we are all. Acting lets the imagination take a driver's seat and that has made all the difference.  I know now that acting has given me an amazing amount of self awareness, resilience, and imagination that allow me to think of creative ideas and how to follow through on their concepts. 

How has your confidence level in yourself changed since you first started Bibbitec?

I think that Bibbitec allowed me to test my ability to manifest a very BIG dream way outside my comfort level. I wanted to invent a better bib and I did. I wanted to get on Shark Tank, and we did. I wanted to sell on Amazon and have fantastic reviews…and we do. All those steps and the million slips in between have built my character and thus my confidence. Knowing the slips are part of the climb! Now we are looking to sell the company to  someone who has the desire to grow it...and I am confident they will.

Bibbitec Founder Susie K. Taylor with her husband and two sons.

Bibbitec Founder Susie K. Taylor with her husband and two sons.

I remember back in 2008 thinking of the idea on the plane and then selling my first Bibbitec. Every step over the past 8 years was a lesson. I had no design background, no business background, no sales background…Learning something new and getting a hold of new concepts is a great way to remember just how unlimited life is.

Learning how to let go and allow others to help is also a great way to build confidence. It shows that you know yourself enough to know you don’t really want to do something and so you let someone else who has more passion for it take over. I believe confidence is knowing you can choose your path and not living in fear that you HAVE to do anything.

Did you always see yourself as entrepreneurial? Or was this something you didn't know about yourself until you had the inspiration from Bibbitec?

I see myself as a dreamer. This particular dream was about a bib and had its roots in making something that could help a great deal of people and not harm anything. I didn’t and don’t think of myself as an entrepreneur..but I am one…I think of myself as someone who is on this earth to do things and wake people up and be as honest as I can as often as possible though kindness.. That is exactly what Bibbitec is to me. A dream that became a reality.

At Moms as Mentors®, we emphasize the importance of resilience. On that note, how were you impacted by your time on Shark Tank and on not getting a deal? How did you handle it when Mr. Wonderful told you to take the "bib behind the barn and shoot it”?

Resilience is important but faith in yourself is at the root of it. I was very confident in Bibbitec by 2013, when the episode aired. What I had no control over what how they were going to edit the episode and depict me. It was terrifying in many ways but I trusted that, during the taping, I said everything I felt needed to be said. That was huge! More than a deal, my main objective was to shed light on the fact that products were being built to break and I, for one, wasn’t going to accept that. In fact, I had pitched my product at the largest baby product expo to major big box stores and when I told them it lasted for years and actually worked and had a multitasking quality, they couldn’t stop laughing. It became a turning point in my journey, having to decide why I was doing this.

That is why during the Shark Tank taping I was talking more to the viewer then to the Sharks. I had already been told over and over what Mr. Wonderful had said to me. 

I turned down BIG BOX stores because it would mean going overseas and using a lesser material.

Looking back, Mr. Wonderful was truly wonderful to me.  He gave me a springboard to step onto my soapbox and preach. I had a lot to say and I wanted to wake people up to what we are all supporting by buying badly made products. We are settling. I am not sure how else I would have been able to show how much making a good product meant. I hope one day to thank him in person for that gift.

I have heard that the fastest growing viewer demographic on Shark Tank is around 11 to 18-year-old girls. Given that, what message do you think it sends if the show has only have one female "shark in the tank" on any given show?

It would be nice to see KINDER people in the tank every now and then. I am not sure that means women, just more DOLPHINS perhaps. More of a visual of what it looks like in a more “conscious capitalistic” world. Well made products that don’t harm the earth and are sustainable and non-toxic. These companies, if they become successful, can change the landscape of consumerism. What about Shark Tank with the owners of Honest Baby and KIND? 

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Did you know that 100% of moms at Moms as Mentors® business program say it sparked a new enthusiasm for their daughters in entrepreneurship?  AND, 75% of moms who've participated in our programs with their daughters feel they improved their own leadership skills.

Your gift to Moms as Mentors will ensure our programs continue to spark girls' interest in business (and STEM).

Our Empower Moms. Empower Girls. campaign ends ON FEBRUARY 2nd.

DONATE NOW and your gift will be matched through our MOM MATCH CHALLENGE!

The one thing I would change about me...because I don't want to pass it onto my daughter

*We're thrilled today to feature a post by Mandy Hickling, our amazing Chief Program Officer who develops the impactful programs that are the hallmark of Moms as Mentors®.*

As Chief Program Officer at Moms as Mentors®, one of the the things I love is that the tools and the opportunities we give moms to be mentors in their daughters' daily lives come both from research and a passion for uncovering better ways to be moms. 

Recently in my quest to be a better mom (as well as develop content for our “Moms Only” series), I’ve been reflecting on my role in my daughter’s life (age 10), both as her role model and mentor. 

I've asked myself specifically, what is the one thing I would change about me because I don’t want to pass it onto my daughter? 

My answer may surprise some people who know me - I would change my fear of failure. I have a deep fear of messing up. More often than not I am scared that I will do or say the wrong thing (and sound completely stupid).  This is especially the case when I think I will be judged by other people (and this has stopped me doing things from skiing to speaking up in a meeting to asking for a better table at a restaurant….)

Writing this blog post is therefore scary to me!! I haven’t written a post before--and I wonder what if no one likes it or shares it? I’m guessing that most people who know me (at least a little) would not think I am the kind of person who is that worried about messing up. After all I regularly travel alone to Africa; I stand up and speak in public; I facilitate programs in front of moms and daughters and I am known to share my (many) opinions. 

I can keep my fear of failure hidden from many people around me but I can’t hide it from my family and importantly from my daughter.  She looks to me for ‘how to be’ in the world - and I’ve started to notice how she takes a step back when she's in a group, how she uses negative ‘self talk’ when doing something new (my speciality - assume the worst, that way you can’t be disappointed), and how she criticizes her own efforts (and dwells on criticism more than praise). 

How is it so easy to pass on our own insecurities? This is the reality of motherhood, who we are at our core will be passed onto our daughters - we can’t hide our expressions, our reactions, fears and insecurities. But what I know from my work with Moms as Mentors is we can start with ourselves and make simple changes in the things we say, the way we react and the messages we convey. 

So since taking on my role as Chief Program Officer at Moms as Mentors I have been making a commitment to take risks and to show my daughter that I am doing what I think is right, even if I fail (even in front of everyone) - because in the end, that’s what I’d want her to do. I want her to see me be confident about new things, to see me try something and be ok if it doesn’t work and I’d like her to do the same - to try, to make mistakes, to pick up the pieces and to try again, knowing it is in the willingness to fail that our best ideas and our biggest achievements come our way. 

By trying to be a better mentor to my daughter, like many other moms out there, I am facing my own fears, taking risks and enjoying more of my achievements. One of the biggest of those achievements was when a mom that came to one of our programs openly shared that the program taught her benefit of ‘tweaking.’ That you can make mistakes, take a look at what went wrong and ‘tweak’ things to make improvements. 

That’s what I want my daughter to learn from me-that failure is no big deal…it is part of learning and growing and succeeding!

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Only 1 week left to support our Empower Moms. Empower Girls. campaign

DONATE NOW and your gift will be matched through our MOM MATCH CHALLENGE!

 

PUZZLE PIECE #2: Working Together

A mom and daughter work on building a "marble roller coaster" in our Build Bridges! program

A mom and daughter work on building a "marble roller coaster" in our Build Bridges! program

Welcome to the second installment of our "puzzle piece series" where we are highlighting the different ways that Moms as Mentors® makes a difference in the lives of girls and their moms.

After each main activity, the whole group gathers together to reflect on mom-daughter teamwork and communication

After each main activity, the whole group gathers together to reflect on mom-daughter teamwork and communication

We have very high standards when it comes to what activities we include in any of our programs. A featured activity can't simply be fun and interesting (though they do need to be fun and interesting!).  For starters, every activity must require effective communication and teamwork. In order to complete a challenge, moms and girls often have to brainstorm on ideas or talk through strategies. They both need to contribute and listen to each other. Sometimes this goes better than others, which is why, after each activity, we bring the group of moms and girls together to reflect and debrief about how the activity went. We get the group talking about how well they communicated with their mom/daughter and if there is anything they noticed that could be improved as we move on to the next activity. 

The very act of working together toward a single goal and reflecting on their teamwork and communication  can have profound impacts on both the moms, daughters and their relationship. Here are just a few comments from moms who noticed a difference in how they worked with and related to their daughters during and after the program.

"Sometimes my daughter finds it hard to let me help her and the Moms as Mentors program really allowed a space for us to have where we could both explore ideas and do things together"

“The program brought us closer together and imbued a sense of curiosity and "working together" in our relationship that has carried forward, mostly in doing normal household tasks like cooking, cleaning, preparing for holidays, and running errands but there is lots of love & joy in those shared day-to-day experiences. That is what life is really about.” 

"Through the topics we discussed, my daughter actually related to me on a very respectful level and I was able to see how smart she is! It really opened the dialogue for more serious conversations!" 

Have you attended one of our programs? If so, we invite you to share how the program impacted your communication/teamwork with your daughter/special girl you brought to the program.

Our PR Problem: Why our biggest strength is our biggest weakness

Something that I've found over and over again since we started to expand The Moms as Mentors® Project is that it's tough to convey the many ways our programs impact the moms and girls who participate in a succinct but comprehensive way.

I've tried many different versions of our elevator pitch, but always feel like in that crucial two minutes when you are talking with a potential supporter or participant, I go on too long, trying to squeeze in too much.

It's a chronic frustration because I know that understanding the complexity of Moms as Mentors® is critical to understanding why it's so important to support our growth.  Our programs have too many benefits to be able to quickly make the case or "pitch" ourselves as a worthy organization to support. (I know this sounds a bit like a #humblebrag, but I really do believe it to be true and it really is a challenge for us!)

Recently a light-bulb went off when I read a Facebook post by one of our volunteers promoting our crowd-funding campaign. She wrote that Moms as Mentors®:

Moms as Mentors® "teaches mothers strategies for supporting their daughters as they grow, and also supports moms in understanding their own strength as mothers and as capable people in the world. They...FOCUS ON different pieces of the puzzle  but all of these workshops ultimately succeed in helping women feel powerful and additionally assist in building strong, healthy relationships between girls and the moms. 

DIFFERENT PIECES OF THE PUZZLE! "That's it!" I realized. Many organizations focus on just one piece of the puzzle related to advancing girls ad women. And while Moms as Mentors® may seem like a simple concept, really our programs benefit moms and girls in multiple ways. We provide different puzzle pieces for the mom-daughter relationship and for the girls and moms as individuals.

That's why I'm going to be running a series over the rest of the campaign (there's only 2 weeks left---PLEASE DONATE TODAY) to share the different puzzle pieces that Moms as Mentors® gives its participants.

Stay tuned for the first installment...

 

 

 

 

She's not just the founder, she's a mentor too...Mine.

Until I met Emilie Liebhoff, I didn't have a real mentor. I never had a teacher that changed the course of my life  or who truly nurtured me and took a long-term interest in my growth. I had plenty of great teachers and other influences in my life, but not that one person who jumped to mind immediately when I thought about mentors before Emilie. 

I can safely say that I attribute much of my professional growth to her. I felt her belief in me from the moment she offered me the job to be program associate at the National Coalition of Girls' Schools, where at the time she was Deputy Director.  I vividly remember nervously preparing to negotiate a bit before I accepted the offer (as an aside- whenever the subject of salary negotiation comes up I always like to share this book that profoundly changed the way I think about value and knowing your worth).

I remember speaking with Emilie on the phone and she shared with me that she was glad I was negotiating for myself--that she knew it was hard to do. She was giving me positive feedback and encouragement for advocating for myself, even as I was handling a job negotiation...with her! Who does that??

Emilie does. That's who.

It would be VERY easy for me to make the rest of this post an extensive list of Emilie's many virtues, as a person, friend, colleague, boss, mentor. However, doing that in a way that doesn't sound sappy and cliche would be much harder. Because Emilie really does possess all the qualities you could ask for in a mentor--she's caring, reassuring, encourages boldness and risk-taking. Her passion for helping raise confidence in girls and women emanates from her deep inside and extends to her fingertips and toes, which is inspiring to me and everyone she meets. She always looks for ways to help me grow professionally. When I first started working for her, she would regularly shoot me quick emails after team meetings, to let me know she thought I made a good point in the meeting, or she was impressed with how I carried myself in a particular situation. That kind of positive reinforcement led me to believe in myself more and the value I brought as an employee, which led to me taking on more challenges.

The paragraph above is not comprehensive. Because I know your time to read this post is limited.

But there's one quality Emilie has regularly exhibited that I feel strongly about sharing with you today.  That's because I believe it is rare, powerful and does not get talked about enough in relation to leadership, management and mentorship.

Emilie understands that if you lift up your team members, everyone rises. Other people's successes inspire her, not threaten her.  She has always encouraged me to tackle new challenges and when those have led to professional successes, she is the first person to be excited for me. She is my biggest champion.

And it's not just me. Everyone I know who has worked for or with her would attest to this about her.

And I can tell you another thing. There's NO WAY I would have had the confidence to take a risk and focus my energies these past two years into the uncertainty of growing a non-profit start-up, if it wasn't for Emilie and all her encouragement along the way. AND, I can tell you that I always told Emilie I would be most comfortable being deputy director with her as the executive director. But she believed in me and trusted me to step up to the front and lead an organization that means more to her than just about anything. I'm still catching up with my own belief in myself to be executive director but I know her belief in me has never wavered. And if that's not the sign of a true mentor, I don't know what is.

SO, Emilie--if you're reading this, THANK YOU. THANK YOU for believing in me, pushing me, empowering me. Thank you for being my mentor. For always making time for me, listening to me, caring about me. I couldn't be happier to be on this professional journey with you. And I hope with this crowd-funding campaign (donate here!), we can take Moms as Mentors® to the next level. If we don't, I know you'll still be there, helping to provide perspective, encouraging me to think big and dream big. And I know you'll be my cheerleader in whatever the future holds. If I'm lucky, my future holds many years of working closely with you.

 

There's busy and then there's MOM BUSY

We believe moms deserve their own word for busy—called “MOM BUSY.” When you’re “mom busy,” your to-do list is a tornado, gaining speed and power as it grows out of control.

But really there are THREE levels of busy:

Busy.

Mom Busy.

And Mom on Monday Busy.

Whether you are a working or stay-at-home mom, Mondays can be equally daunting. With the hustle that comes with the start of a new week, we don’t blame you if the feeling of angst lurks within you when Sunday night rolls around.

To help get through this  “Mom on Monday Busy” day, we wanted to share two things to make you smile.

1. Check out this video for candidates interviewing for “The World’s Toughest Job."

Even if you’ve seen it before, we recommend a second watch. It’s a testament to why moms deserve their own word for busy. Worth a watch even if you aren’t a mom! In fact, it will likely make you want to call your mom and say thank you.
(*Shameless plug: Don’t forget that two of our crowd-funding campaign perks give you a powerful and fun way to thank your mom for all she has done for you: our “official mentor certificate” for donations of $35 and “Moms as Mentors® will call your mom to say thank you” for a donation of $125. Donate HERE).

2. Check out this heart-warming open letter from a working mom to a stay-at-home mom and vice versa. It's the ultimate validation for "mom busy" whether you are a working or stay-at-home mom.  

We’ll leave it at that because it’s Monday after all and know the last thing you have a lot of is time.

Best wishes,
Leslie


 

 


 
 

 

 

 

I don't want to step on anyone's toes But...

I think I always tried to be polite--here's me at a birthday party raising my hand...Heaven forbid I spoke out of turn.

I think I always tried to be polite--here's me at a birthday party raising my hand...Heaven forbid I spoke out of turn.

I've realized, with the help of others, that I worry about stepping on people's toes too often. It's something I've always worried about. I have my own ideas and opinions, but worry that by putting them out there I might somehow "come on too strong" (whatever that means), hurt someone's feelings, or challenge the status quo in a way that makes people uncomfortable.

The first time I ever remember anyone bringing this aspect of my personality to my attention was when I had the chance to read a copy of a recommendation a high school guidance counselor had written about me in high school--it said something like "Leslie is a passionate person with a gentleness that sometimes gets in the way."

My mind was blown--as I had never thought about myself in just that way, but I realized it was very true. There are things I care about SO MUCH but I'm hesitant to put them out there too strongly. 

But the thing is, I've realized recently that no one has ever accused me of stepping on their toes. So I don't know why I worry about it so much. In fact, I had a wake up call a couple of years ago when I was about to speak up in a team meeting where I was working at the time.  I prefaced what I said with "I don't want to step on any one's toes but..." And my friend and co-worker at the time, interrupted me to say "Leslie-you ALWAYS say that and you NEVER step on ANYONE'S TOES...just tell us what you want to say! We really want to hear it!" 

There was something quite empowering about that moment. It made me realize the world can handle what I put out there--the only one holding me back is me...not other people's toes. Other people's toes are just fine...

And so I am going to speak up now about something now that I am passionate about. And I'm going to trust that you, lovely readers, are wearing closed-toed shoes and have nothing to worry about.  

What am I passionate about these days?

Empowering girls and women. To raise a whole generation of girls that aren't afraid to step on anyone's toes, especially when it comes to things they are passionate about. To help make it easier today for women to speak up about things that matter to them. Because I don't think I'm alone in my concerns about toes. It reminds me of this commercial from 2014 about women saying "I'm sorry" too much and when it is completely unnecessary (and when often they are the ones owed an apology). Or Jennifer Lawrence's recent letter in Lenny about her challenges with asking for the same pay as her male co-stars. She reached a point where she said: "I’m over trying to find the “adorable” way to state my opinion and still be likable!" Hear hear!

I want to help girls and women speak up more and be confident of their own worthiness and value that they bring to the table, whether that's the water table, dinner table, or boardroom table. 

But I can't do that if I don't speak up myself. So here goes...

I need your help. I've been working for Moms as Mentors, essentially unpaidfor two years. And I can't keep doing that. If we aren't able to raise enough funds during this crowd-funding campaign, I'm going to have to stop working on Moms as Mentors®. And that breaks my heart. Because, despite a lack of funds these last 2 years, the one thing we haven't lacked is AMAZING positive feedback about our programs. I just came across this quote today from a mom who had participated in one of our programs: 

"This is a wonderful and empowering experience. I knew my daughter and I would enjoy the time together, but I never realized how much it would mean to her. At least twice a month she tells me she wants to do another MOM program. She says that she had so much fun, and she loved how it was just the two of us. We would love more programs to be offered and for them to be offered more frequently. There is no other program out there with this unique female-empowering and mother-mentoring approach. It's something that all mothers and daughters should be able to experience."

We have many more testimonials just like that one. 

And we're not going to be able to develop new programs if I worry about stepping on people's toes. 

To support our campaign, click the image above!

To support our campaign, click the image above!

And so I ask you, PLEASE consider making a contribution of any size to our IndieGogo campaign. Every little bit helps. Really. You could donate $1 and that would be helpful. But, if I'm really putting it all out on the line, please consider giving MORE than a $1. Heck, if you can, give a LOT!

And share this blog post with the women in your life. And, also please share it with the amazing men out there who want their wives, sisters, aunts, mothers, daughters, granddaughters to know they deserve an equal seat at the table and have the confidence to pursue their dreams, take healthy risks, try try again and more. And encourage them to make a contribution (and then share the post). 

You can donate to the campaign here

Thank you.

Best wishes,
Leslie

JOIN THE OTHERS WHO BELIEVE IN OUR WORK TO IMPACT THE NEXT GENERATION OF FEMALE LEADERS.
 

Don't wait.

Our Empower Moms. Empower Girls. campaign ends on TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2nd.

DONATE NOW and your gift will be matched through our "MOM MATCH CHALLENGE"


JOIN OUR CAMPAIGN HERE!